My Son The Hurricane Blows Into Clarksburg
Beggar’s Road Brings Original Celtic Music To Meaford Hall
Sass Jordan Revisits Her Triumph Twenty-five Years Later
Clap For The Sinners Choir
Lemon Bucket Orkestra Brings The Party To Meaford
Weekend Poster Board Nov. 3rd, 2017
Amelia Curran Brings Her Watershed Tour to Heartwood
Jack de Keyser, Blues Legend, Coming to Harbour Street Fish Bar
My Sweet Patootie and Emma Wright Join Cast of The Last Waltz

My Son The Hurricane Blows Into Clarksburg

All summer long there has been a hurricane blowing across Canada.  In May it hit Owen Sound and this Saturday it will descend on Clarksburg.  No need to hunker down, though.  Instead you want to jump up and dance.  It’s My Son the Hurricane, a big 14 piece band (half of that is the brass section!) that plays funk with a healthy mix of jazz and hip-hop thrown in.  It takes a lot for frontman Jacob Bergsma to ride that beast but he’s been earning kudos for his charisma and vocal chops. Earshot said, “The Hurricane sound is still a big, fun wall of brass, a propellant rhythm section and the hip hop styling’s of emcee Jacob Bersgma, who can playfully pluck every nerve in your body with his voice.”   

Even better, the band now includes a foil for Jacob in the form of Sylvie Kindree, the singer who  did so much to bring out the genius of Bryan Leckie’s songs on Kreuger Motel.  She’s  doubly valuable to the band, helping out drummer and de facto manager Danno O’Shea with a lot of the business load he has taken on for the band.

Beggar’s Road Brings Original Celtic Music To Meaford Hall

This Saturday, Nov. 18th, Bognor Jam Productions presents Beggar’s Road at Meaford Hall.  If the name of the band sounds familiar it’s because it has taken its name from a recording by The Shards, a band formed in 2000 in Owen Sound.  Beggar’s Road is the current incarnation of that band.  With just a few personnel changes, Beggars Road retains the same exciting approach to Celtic music that made the Shards a popular local band.

The Shards were originally brought together by Bob Robin, who writes the majority of the songs for the group.  After a lengthy apprenticeship in rock bands, Bob found his niche with the traditional sound of Celtic music and it inspired him to write evocative songs about our area around Georgian Bay.  He was particularly encouraged by the response that greeted the group’s recording of his song “Georgian Bay Bound”.  Now the traditional music of the British Isles is in his blood and when he’s not playing with Beggar’s Road, he contributes his talents to a traditional dance group called Scatter The Cats.

Sass Jordan Revisits Her Triumph Twenty-five Years Later

When Sass Jordan appears at Heartwood tonight it will be something more than just another concert.  She is touring as part of a celebration of an important milestone in her career, which she has found a way to re-create.

Twenty-five years ago her album “Racine” peaked at #2 on the Billboard charts with a style of swaggering rock that reflected the times and raw vocals that paved the way for artists like Allanah Myles and Amanda Marshall.  Now she has set the wayback machine to that moment again and brought it full circle by re-recording the entire album.  Touring to support the new/old album gives her a chance to reminisce with fans and rekindle some of that old magic. Billing it as “intimate and interactive”, she will engage the audience with stories between the songs and even take questions from the stage. The idea is to rekindle special memories for her fans.

Rather than create the re-creation with all of the technological tools that are available today, she respected the original enough to take an authentic approach.  She assembled a team of respected musicians and created a family atmosphere in a Calgary studio to “add additional depth and historical accuracy”.    It was a real band playing real music: Rudy Sarzo on bass, Brent Fitz on drums and percussion, Chris Caddell on guitars and Derek Sharp on guitars, keyboards and production.

“What you hear is what happened,” she says proudly, “no click tracks and no auto-tune. This record was made with great care and precision in order to be played LOUD and PROUD!!!!”

Clap For The Sinners Choir

This Saturday, CROW Bar and Variety in Collingwood is bringing The Sinners’ Choir to town.

The best bands are always those that evolve naturally from a shared love of the music they play.  That’s the case with this trio, in which players from three generations have come together to blend their talents.  They also blend their voices, with an easy harmony that falls sweetly on your ear.

Working as a full-time musician, as with any job, can wear on you.  The thing about musicians, though, is that more often than not when they take a break from their regular gig, their idea of relaxation is to get together with somebody else and play something different.  That’s how this band came together.  Their shared joy in what they do is so infectious that it has led to another regular gig for them.  Their private jam sessions became public with a longstanding residency at The Rex in Toronto.  As the public caught on to their sound, they found themselves having to set aside the occasional date at the Rex to take other offers, for which they are increasingly in demand.  And now they are bringing their sweet harmonies to the sweet air of Georgian Bay.

The most seasoned pro of the group is bass player Terry Wilkins, whose name will be familiar to any fan of 80’s Toronto rock and blues.  He was already established in Australia in the 60’s with a popular band called The Flying Circus.  When they tried their luck in San Francisco, a chance meeting with members of McKenna Mendelson Mainline brought them to Toronto.

Making Toronto his permanent home, Terry played bass with Rough Trade from 1978 to 1982 and did stints with Lighthouse and David Wilcox.  At the same time he played with a variety of visiting artists of wide-ranging styles, including Dr. John, Maria Muldaur and Levon Helm.  Consistently working through the decades, he has worked more recently with Freeman Dre and The Kitchen Party.

Drummer Adam Warner has a similar history of being an in demand player, except he started a couple of decades later.   He’s been around, playing at legendary clubs like The Cavern in Liverpool, CBGB’s in New York, and has played at a command concert for Paul Anka and birthday celebrations for the Queen of Holland.  As a writer and composer, he has released solo works, composed musical backdrops for David Suzuki, and performed or recorded with various members of The Barenaked Ladies,The Tragically Hip, Blue Rodeo, Sloan, Great Big Sea, Big Sugar, and Moist.

Guitarist Adam Beer Colacino was busy growing up while his bandmates were making their  international reputations.  He’s worked with Devin Cuddy, Whitney Rose and members of Downchild Blues Band.  He’s teamed up with blues guitarist Fraser Melvin and an 8-piece horn section in the The Melvin-Colacino Band.

The band takes turns on lead vocals, with the other two providing harmonies, as they mix it up with originals that reflect the wide-ranging experience and tastes of the players.  When a band loves playing together as much as these three obviously do, it is always a delight for the audience.

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