Tag Archives: The Guess Who

All You Need is (The David) Love (Band)

by Bill Monahan

Saturday, Jan. 13, The Harbour Street Fish Bar in Collingwood welcomes back the David Love Band with what they call “Power Pop For Baby Boomers,” promising, “Absolutely no blues whatsoever. Just happy, shiny songs. “

The trio, consisting of Love, Darrell McNeill, and Kevin Mulligan serves up a long list of pop songs from the sixties and seventies.  While he has played guitar with some heavy hitters (Randy Bachman calls him “my first choice for super solid guitar playing and vocal back up on any rock band I put together”), in this combo, Love takes on the bass, with McNeill on guitar and Mulligan on drums.  All three of them provide vocals.  They cover the British Invasion and the Summer of Love along with some classics from the likes of Tom Petty, ZZ Top, and The Byrds.  This trio, along with an acoustic duo he has with Brian LeBlanc, allows Love to spend more time at home with his family after almost forty years of touring the world with a variety of bands.

In the seventies David Love began his professional career with a band called Titan and two years later moved on to Dodger, touring Ontario and Northern Quebec.  After a ten-year break from the music business from 1979 to 1989, he formed a quartet called The Intenders and was back on the road. Four years later, he joined The Carpet Frogs, a gig he stuck with for eighteen years.  With them and on his own, he served fourteen years as a member of The Burton Cummings Band, on guitar and harmony vocals, and when the two principal members of The Guess Who reunited for five years to form the Bachman/Cummings Band, he was on board.

He continues to perform as part of Craig Martin’s stellar group of world-class musicians create concerts with note for note reproductions of Classic Albums Live, an assembly that frequently plays Meaford Hall.  Anyone who attended The Beatles No. 1 Hits this past summer at Meaford Hall saw him in that show.

He notes on his Facebook page: “I love playing that music and to be with so many other talented performers recreating it note for note is very fulfilling.”

While his power pop trio can’t hope to reproduce these classic songs note for note, they can elicit great memories and, as he says, “deliver Pop Rock with a melodic sound and high-energy beat, leading audiences to tap their toes, snap their fingers or jiggle their bones on the dance floor.”

So jiggle your Baby Boomer bones over to the Fish Bar on Saturday night.  There’s a $5 cover and the music starts at nine.

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Time Travel at The Marsh Street Centre

Review by Bill Monahan of the concert at Marsh Street Centre, Sat., June 10, 2017

Photos by Robert Burcher

The Marsh Street Centre capped off its day-long 90th birthday celebration on Saturday with a special sold-out concert.  The band was called The Amazing Time Machine, a name that host Florian Lenders said “we just made up”.  He explained to the audience that “Chris Scerri and I got together and brainstormed how to celebrate this birthday and we came up with the idea of musical selections that spanned the years of the building’s history.”  Of course, Chris knew where to go to get the band capable of such a challenge.  He called on his good friend Tyler Yarema, as he has so often with such impressive results, to put something together.  Tyler, a seasoned veteran, pulled together a band from his many friends and created the special program for the occasion.  During the evening, audience members commented on the fact that what was essentially a pick-up band could put on such an impressive show. It was because this band was a collection of top players, even though they may not be household names, musicians who could fill several shelves between them with the awards they’ve won, who are used to taking on any musical challenge.  In essence it was a band of all-star sidemen.

Tyler Yarema loves playing to Georgian Bay audiences

Tyler Yarema has played often in the area this past year, at the behest, as he mentioned, of Chris Scerri, and he continues to build a solid local fan base.  He makes it clear that these are not just gigs for pay, but he comes here because he loves to play for these audiences.  “I always love coming here,” he told the audience, “there is such a great community here around Georgian Bay, where you all support each other.”

And the evening was a celebration of community.  The sense of community was palpable in the hall and when at one point Florian mentioned names of people who had helped make this night possible it was a very long list.

The concert was divided into three sets.  The first set started out with twenties jazz and took us through to the Swing Era.  The second set visited the birth of rock and roll and took us up to The Yardbirds and The Who.  And the final set covered the rest of the 20th Century with selections from The Beatles, The Stones, The Guess Who and The Band, along with three Bill Withers songs and a single selection from the 21st Century with Amy Winehouse’s classic “Valerie”.

Sax battle with Alison Young and Richard Underhill

Tyler, who is a master of boogie-woogie and stride piano, was in his element with this set, as were the two saxophonists in the band, Alison Young (who was outstanding!) and Richard UnderhillLouis Jordan’s “Is You Is Or Is You Ain’t My Baby” was near the beginning of a set that culminated in “Sing, Sing, Sing” which for me was the highlight of the whole evening.  It began with Tyler’s perfect reproduction of Louis Prima’s vocals and allowed a long section in the middle for a “battle of the saxes” which was thrilling, alto and tenor trading licks.  While Prima wrote the song, it had been recorded several artists including The Andrews Sisters.  But the most famous version was by Benny Goodman and the highlight of it was Gene Krupa’s drum solo that shook the world back in the thirties.  Drummer Chris Lamont took advantage of that historical nugget to shine in his own Krupaesque solo after the sax battle.  When a band like this takes on a song like that it is not just nostalgia.  It is as exciting as it must have been for the dancers who filled the pavilions at Port Elgin and Sauble Beach back in the day.

It was, as billed, an amazing time machine experience, and a fitting tribute to Florian Lenders.

Special guest Tom Barlow rocked the house

But it wasn’t until the second set that this crowd began to dance.  Special guest Tom Barlow set the pace with the song that caused riots in England back in 1955 when Bill Haley and the Comets introduced “Rock Around The Clock” to the first generation to be called “teenagers”.  When he segued into “Johnny B. Goode” every available space on the floor was filled with dancers, and they didn’t sit down for the rest of the night.