Tag Archives: East Back Line

The Thursday Outlook – Sept. 21 to 25, 2017

At Kimberley Hall, just down the road from Meaford, a special art show is running all weekend and on Saturday night it will include live music from some local favourites.  East Back Line, with Paul Woolner, David Marshak, Beaker Granger, and Tom Thwaits, will be on hand along with Chris Scerri’s new band Horseshoes & Handgrenades with Jon Zaslow, Beaker Granger, Erik Vandeweerdhof and as a special guest, violinist Victoria Yeh.  The music is just part of a weekend-long celebration of local visual artists billed as “Apple and Art”.

If you can time it right, be on Hurontario Street in Collingwood today at 12:30 and you’ll be treated to a special pop-up concert with Tyler Yarema and Chuck Jackson at one of the pianos that are set up on the sidewalk.  This is part of the promotion for a show that these two blues veterans have planned at The Historic Gayety Theatre on Oct. 5th.

Saturday night on Hurontario street it’s the annual Collingwood Art Crawl which includes live music in the evening from the Mike McCarthy Band. 

The Thursday Outlook – May 11 to 14, 2017

Dave Hawkins is well known in Owen Sound but rarely plays in Meaford so Friday night is a good chance to catch him in a solo performance at The Red Door Pub at the Meaford Motel.  He’ll be sharing the night with Bill Monahan and John Brownlow.  Dave was co-owner and manager of the music store in Owen Sound which has now become Long and McQuade, and he has long been a supporter of local music.  He rarely plays events like this one which feature his impressive songwriting talents, but he regularly fronts (along with his wife Trish) the popular country dance band Trish and The Tractors.  Bill Monahan is seen occasionally at open stages singing his original songs, and regularly participates in the summer concerts at the harbour for Friends of The Library and The Meaford Stomp.  John Brownlow formerly fronted The Sportswriters and currently is working on a solo album at his home studio where he has produced some local artists.  This is the first time for the Red Door to be presenting an evening dedicated to songwriters, but it is an idea that has been catching on with other venues in the area.  The evening starts early at seven and runs to ten, with no cover.

The last artist that John Brownlow produced before immersing himself in his solo project was local singer-songwriter Greg Smith, who has a unique approach to songwriting, creating characters and narratives that carry over from one song to another.  Greg will be opening for Limestone Chorus tonight at Heartwood Hall in Owen Sound.  Limestone Chorus is a St. Catherines band with interesting instrumentation and three-part harmonies.  The name of their band, their former name Shore Thing, and their debut album Deer Friends, all alert you to a winning way with words as well as a focus on natural imagery.  They are also one of the bands that John Brownlow captured in his Epping Sessions series of music videos.  If you miss them tonight you can catch them over dinner tomorrow night at Bruce Wine Bar.

On Saturday night, The Bicycle Café in Flesherton features  East Back Line, a band so impressive that they had a road named after them.

The Collingwood Glee Club has a fun event planned for Meaford Hall on Saturday night with a variety show called Major Treble.  This award-winning group is presenting solo and ensemble vocal performances combined with dance.

Kimberley Community Out In Force To Support Meaford Refugees

There was a hint of spring on Saturday evening and on the steps of Kimberley Hall, down at the bottom of the Beaver Valley, the bagpipes of Michael Findlay resonated through the village calling people to gather for the celebration.  It was the special fundraiser organized by the Meaford Refugee Welcome Group, promising a variety show with an array of local talents.

The MRWG had been formed a year and a half ago with the goal of bringing a Syrian family to our community to escape the violence of their homeland.  Just over a year ago, Hanan and Rajab Al Sheayer came to Meaford with their four children.  Since then they have settled into the community with the children embracing school and mom and dad completing a year of ESL courses and starting a business selling their delicious Syrian food.  Now the support group wants to bring Hanan’s sister and her family here as well from a refugee camp in Lebanon where the children  of the camp sell flowers and gum to try to eke out a meagre living.  There is some urgency to this effort because the youngest boy in the family is suffering from cancer and his life might be saved by access to the cancer treatment centre at Sunnybrook.  If sufficient funds can be raised by the end of this month, it means the family can be brought to our community this year.  The event on Saturday night in Kimberley was designed to bring the community together to raise awareness and funds to make another miracle happen.

The hall filled with bustling neighbours early in the evening, soon reaching capacity.  Before the music even began there was a sense of celebration.  The enticing aroma of Syrian food, prepared by the Al Sheayers and offered free to everyone, filled the hall, along with the excited murmer of conversation.  Master of Ceremonies and one-man technical crew, Chris Scerri, hustled to set up the sound system.

The early part of the evening offered a succession of singer-songwriters with the emphasis on youth.  Songwriter Greg Smith, who is quickly establishing a reputation for his unique story songs, started off the evening, playing with enthusiasm and joy even though his songs were somewhat buried in the acoustics of the room and the audience conversation.  He was followed by Abby Woodhouse who was last year’s winner of GBSS Idol.  She sang a number of country covers and her version of “I Fall To Pieces” was particularly impressive, coming closer than most singers can to the emotive power of Patsy Cline’s original.  Isaac Goodings followed with a strong performance of originals mixed with covers.  Then, to cap off the solo acoustic part of the evening there was a big jump in age when Bill Monahan sang a few originals and got the crowd pumped up with a rousing version of “Jambalaya” and a Bo Diddley song.  Things were hopping from then on.

The exciting rhythmic sounds of klezmer music from Broken Bagel Scene had people up and dancing in the few spaces available.  That was followed by some piping from Michael Findlay, a couple of songs from Michael O’Connell, and then East Back Line, the band built around the songs of Paul Allan and David Marshak from Beaver Valley, with Beaker Granger on drums.  They had everyone dancing.  Chris Scerri joined them to sing some songs at the end of their set, Hartley from Broken Bagel Scene joined in and the evening climaxed with a jam of “I Shall be Released”.

It was a big success for everyone concerned and brought the Meaford Refugee Welcome Group closer to their goal.  If you missed it, you can still contribute through a tax deductible contribution by cheque to:  Christ Church Anglican Meaford, with MRWG in the memo section.  Christ Church Anglican, 34 Boucher St E, Meaford, ON N4L 1E3.

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Fourth Annual Mapleplaooza Turned to Fundraiser

Next Saturday, March 18th, the fourth annual Maplepalooza concert at Kimberley Hall is being dedicated as a fund raiser for the Meaford Refugee Welcome Group.  The group, originally organized by Cathy Miller, the pastor at Christ Anglican Church, and several prominent caring citizens, brought the Al-Sheayar family to Meaford just over a year ago and has helped them to settle in.  The family is doing very well.  The children are enrolled in local schools and have enjoyed various summer camps. The parents are attending English language classes, and are working to establish a specialty food business. Now they want offer the same opportunity to extended members of the family: Hanan’s sister, her husband and 4 children.

The rules have changed since the original push by the new Liberal government to meet their campaign commitment of bringing 20,000 refugees to the country within a few short months.  For this application, due this month, the government requires that the group raise a minimum of $32,000.  They are hoping to reach a target of $50,000, with the money going toward resettlement costs of the family and the first year of their living costs.  Donations are tax-deductible.

Maplepalooza has been an annual celebration of tree-tapping season organized by Jonathan Robinson in the great little community of Kimberley down in the bottom of the Beaver Valley.  He’s invited friends to come to his sugar bush to tap trees during the day and then party with him that night at Kimberley Hall to the sounds of live music.  This year his generous spirit has turned the party into a benefit concert to help raise funds for the new refugee initiative.