Tag Archives: RPR

The Thursday Outlook – Sept. 28 to Oct. 2, 2017

Live music fans have some tough choices to make on a very busy Thursday night tonight.

Meaford Hall presents Measha Brueggergosman tonight on a return visit.  This year she has released a memoir called “Something is AlwaysOn Fire”, reflecting on the ups and downs of her life in opera on the world stages.  Her work is not restricted to opera.  On stage she explores spirituals, gospel hymns and jazz standards, following her own personal path.  Earlier in the year she released “Songs of Freedom”, a collection of songs that, as she told Vision TV, “were born out of a time when my people were oppressed and needed to find a way not only to communicate with each other, but also to express themselves”.  Selections include Swing Low, Sweet Chariot, Got Tell It On The Mountain, This Little Light Of Mine, He’s Got The Whole World In His Hands and, Amazing Grace.  With her four-piece band, she usually mixes in some jazz standards like My Funny Valentine. All of these elements will combine tonight to give the audience a sense of the things that are most meaningful to her.

 

Fans of local talent are excited about the CD release party tonight at Heartwood Hall in which Drew McIvor performs his new recording with a 10-piece band, with an opening set by Luke Martin.  Drew will have copies of “Through The Tangle of Trees” hot off the press for sale at the concert.

Piano man Tyler Yarema, who specializes in stride piano and boogie-woogie, will be joining Tamica Herod and The Harbour Street Band tonight at the Harbour Street Fish Bar for what is sure to be a rocking show.  Tyler will be back in Collingwood a week from tonight with a special concert at The Historic Gayety Theatre.  He and Chuck Jackson, lead vocalist for the Downchild Blues Band, play a lot of duo dates together and at next week’s concert they will be recording a live CD in a celebrative event that gathers a number of friends to join them.

This Saturday at The Gayety Theatre, rockabilly fans will be treated to a performance by Robert Gordon, voice of the rockabilly revival that engulfed England in the late 70’s.  Celebrated for his authentic sound, his debut album paired him with Link Wray, a guitarist who didn’t mimic the early rockers but actually was one.  Gordon’s repertoire spans early Elvis, Gene Vincent and others from that era who defined a new sound that disappeared all too quickly for some people.  His show in the town that hosts the world’s largest annual Elvis festival, should attract a cohort of discerning fans.

Local Players Excited To Be Doing The Last Waltz

The latest production at Meaford Hall by Chris Scerri, a tribute to The Last Waltz scheduled for November 25th, is a bit of a departure from his previous productions.  Up to this point he has put together variety shows that combined local and imported talent, built mainly around the talents of musical director Tyler Yarema and others from the Port Credit area that Chris has introduced to Meaford.  This time around it will be all local talent, some of the best that our area offers, under the musical direction of keyboard player John Hume.

For each member of this tribute band, The Band and their iconic farewell concert both hold special significance.

“It was a magic moment in music history,” says Chris Scerri, “that allowed for some of the most influential modern day artists to get together for the ultimate Jam.”  He adds that the DVD of the concert movie is one which, “I can watch time and time again, and continue to be inspired by both the musical talents and the show itself.”

The Last Waltz was the name Robbie Robertson gave to the farewell concert of The Band, performed on American Thanksgiving Day in 1976 at Winterland Ballroom in San Francisco.  A film of the concert by Martin Scorcese was released in 1978 and was hailed by film critic Michael Wilmington as “the greatest rock concert movie ever made – and maybe the best rock movie, period”  Time bears that out, with the influence of the movie being felt almost forty years later.

Steve Dickinson Revisits His Roots at Massie Hall

Local music fans, and particularly fans of Bob Segar, have a real treat in store this Friday at Massie Hall with a concert by Steve Dickinson.  This is a return to his roots for Steve, who grew up in nearby Elsinore, learning his vocal chops by listening to the records of Bob Segar among others.  He was the first performer to play at Massie Hall thirteen years ago when a local non-profit group bought the historic schoolhouse from the school board to create a community centre and local musician Pete Miller (May Contain Nuts) approached them with the idea of putting on concerts there.  “If I remember right,” says Steve, “I sold him the PA there.”

Steve served on the board of Summerfolk and performed there.  “For many people it seems performing at Summerfolk is seen as the pinnacle for them,” said Steve, “but I saw it as a launching pad”.  He went from there to showcases in Nashville and, over the years has recorded four albums of his own songs.

Steve had grown up playing music locally.  “Steve Richie (Tanglefoot and RPR) was the drummer in my first band,” he says.  He played around a lot with a group that included Rob Richie (Tanglefoot and RPR), Sandra Swannell (Tanglefoot and My Sweet Patootie), and Roger Williamson, who will be joining him at this concert.

“He is a great talent,” says Steve, “He and I have done some duos over the years and I feel very fortunate that he will be sitting in with me.”  Performing at Massie Hall this time around was suggested to him by Bryan Leckie (The Kreuger Band) and his is looking forward to the opportunity to play some of his own songs in an acoustic performance.  “I’m glad I’ve got some new material to play,” he says, “I’m going to tell some stories about my escapades and sing my songs.”

He also appreciates that this area is a hotbed of exceptional talent, and it’s changed since he was young, with a lot more venues open to original music.

And he has some great stories to tell.  His most recent adventures include singing on a tribute album of songs written by the legendary Glasgow songwriter Frankie Miller, joining a stellar international cast that includes Willie Nelson, Elton John, Rod Stewart, Joe Walsh, Huey Lewis, Kid Rock and many more household names.  The fact that Steve, the only Canadian and not exactly a household name, was included in the project speaks to his talent, particularly his powerful voice.

My Sweet Patootie Kicks Off Desboro Music Hall’s Summer Season

This Saturday, Apr. 22nd, the Desboro Music Hall will be kicking off its second concert season with the international folk/jazz trio, My Sweet Patootie, a  show that Driftwood Magazine describes as “two parts exemplary musicianship, one part vaudeville comedy”.  The opening act will be Alicia Toner from Canada’s East Coast.

The Desboro Music Hall was created when brothers Phil and Joe Klages bought the historic Anglican church in town.  Ever since the community centre closed down there had been a gap in the local culture and Phil and Joe, music fans who grew up in Desboro, saw the church as an ideal venue for concerts and other community activities.  Their inaugural year was a great success, a mixture of local musicians as well as acts like Oh Susanna, Alfie Smith and Mark Reeves.  Their choice of featured acts reflects the affection local audiences feel for roots based music and they have the good taste to include only the best purveyors of the style.  It is the kind of concert series that you can attend knowing that it will be good because of the care with which it was put together.  This year’s series starts and ends with exemplary performers who also happen to be Meaford residents, starting with My Sweet Patootie, who reside in Meaford when they are not on tour, and ending in October with The Honey Brothers, featuring Meaford talents Drew McIvor and Jayden Grahlman, along with Jay Stiles.

My Sweet Patootie was formed as a duo in 2007 when the long-running Canadian roots band Tanglefoot disbanded after decades of touring.   The two halves of Tanglefoot took off in different directions.  One half teamed up with Meaford-based drummer and singer-songwriter Beaker Granger to form RPR (stands for Richie/Parrish/Richie) and put the emphasis on roots rock.  The Patootie half took off in an entirely different direction and, now after several years of touring and recording, they have evolved into a totally unique live act with recordings that have a sheen to them combining nostalgia with superlative musicianship.

If they were a very serious act the audience would be moved by their extraordinary musicianship.  If they were mediocre players, their energetic showmanship would easily carry the day.  When the two elements are combined they put on an irresistible show.

Both Terry Young and Sandra Swanell of My Sweet Patootie are classically trained, Terry in voice and Sandra in violin and viola.  Terry’s roots, though, go back to Canadiana folk and his fingerpicking guitar style was influenced by players like Bruce Cockburn.  Sandra was the principal violist of the Georgian Bay Symphony and fronted the Celtic art-rock band The Shards before joining Tanglefoot in 2005.  Despite her classical training her violin more often than not echoes the “hot jazz” of Stephane Grapelli.  Together they took their superlative instrumental chops and applied it to a hybrid of folk, Celtic and old jazz.  All of these elements can be heard in their performances and their recordings.  They mix evocative covers with their own originals which are simultaneously moving and whimsical.