Tag Archives: Tanglefoot

Sharlene Wallace Brings The Harp to Harp and Holly Christmas Concerts

Sharlene Wallace, one of Canada’s most prolific and influential harpists, winner of several international awards, is making room in her busy schedule this Christmas season to play a number of “Harp and Holly” concerts in our area.

 

“I love the Harp and Holly show,” she says, “I have been sincerely looking forward to this all year.”

Harp and Holly is a special musical journey created by Terry Young and Sandra Swannell several years ago.  In what has become a Christmas tradition, it will include a number of concerts starting this Sunday in Sauble Beach and including stops in Guelph, Colpoy’s Bay, Wasaga Beach and finally Owen Sound just a few days before Christmas.    With Harp & Holly this world-class trio blends Celtic, New Age and Baroque sounds to immerse audiences in the magic of the Christmas season.

 “It’s all beautiful music, a really beautiful uplifting show,” says Sharlene, “The arrangements are very interesting and a nice combination of tunes.  I absolutely love this show a lot.”

Beggar’s Road Brings Original Celtic Music To Meaford Hall

This Saturday, Nov. 18th, Bognor Jam Productions presents Beggar’s Road at Meaford Hall.  If the name of the band sounds familiar it’s because it has taken its name from a recording by The Shards, a band formed in 2000 in Owen Sound.  Beggar’s Road is the current incarnation of that band.  With just a few personnel changes, Beggars Road retains the same exciting approach to Celtic music that made the Shards a popular local band.

The Shards were originally brought together by Bob Robin, who writes the majority of the songs for the group.  After a lengthy apprenticeship in rock bands, Bob found his niche with the traditional sound of Celtic music and it inspired him to write evocative songs about our area around Georgian Bay.  He was particularly encouraged by the response that greeted the group’s recording of his song “Georgian Bay Bound”.  Now the traditional music of the British Isles is in his blood and when he’s not playing with Beggar’s Road, he contributes his talents to a traditional dance group called Scatter The Cats.

The Thursday Outlook – Sept. 28 to Oct. 2, 2017

Live music fans have some tough choices to make on a very busy Thursday night tonight.

Meaford Hall presents Measha Brueggergosman tonight on a return visit.  This year she has released a memoir called “Something is AlwaysOn Fire”, reflecting on the ups and downs of her life in opera on the world stages.  Her work is not restricted to opera.  On stage she explores spirituals, gospel hymns and jazz standards, following her own personal path.  Earlier in the year she released “Songs of Freedom”, a collection of songs that, as she told Vision TV, “were born out of a time when my people were oppressed and needed to find a way not only to communicate with each other, but also to express themselves”.  Selections include Swing Low, Sweet Chariot, Got Tell It On The Mountain, This Little Light Of Mine, He’s Got The Whole World In His Hands and, Amazing Grace.  With her four-piece band, she usually mixes in some jazz standards like My Funny Valentine. All of these elements will combine tonight to give the audience a sense of the things that are most meaningful to her.

 

Fans of local talent are excited about the CD release party tonight at Heartwood Hall in which Drew McIvor performs his new recording with a 10-piece band, with an opening set by Luke Martin.  Drew will have copies of “Through The Tangle of Trees” hot off the press for sale at the concert.

Piano man Tyler Yarema, who specializes in stride piano and boogie-woogie, will be joining Tamica Herod and The Harbour Street Band tonight at the Harbour Street Fish Bar for what is sure to be a rocking show.  Tyler will be back in Collingwood a week from tonight with a special concert at The Historic Gayety Theatre.  He and Chuck Jackson, lead vocalist for the Downchild Blues Band, play a lot of duo dates together and at next week’s concert they will be recording a live CD in a celebrative event that gathers a number of friends to join them.

This Saturday at The Gayety Theatre, rockabilly fans will be treated to a performance by Robert Gordon, voice of the rockabilly revival that engulfed England in the late 70’s.  Celebrated for his authentic sound, his debut album paired him with Link Wray, a guitarist who didn’t mimic the early rockers but actually was one.  Gordon’s repertoire spans early Elvis, Gene Vincent and others from that era who defined a new sound that disappeared all too quickly for some people.  His show in the town that hosts the world’s largest annual Elvis festival, should attract a cohort of discerning fans.

“The Woods Are Burning” Celebrates Tom Thomson at His Birthplace

It was a hundred years ago this Saturday that Tom Thomson, one of Canada’s most important painters, disappeared into the wilderness.  A magical evening called “The Woods Are Burning” is planned at The Historic Leith Church, the church that Thomson and his family attended when he was growing up in Leith, to mark the occasion with a celebration of his life and work presented in poetry and song.  At the helm of this production is singer-songwriter David Sereda, and he has assembled some of the area’s most impressive musicians along with internationally celebrated poet Anne Michaels to create “a long kind of journey in two parts about the painter and the place.”

David Sereda has a long history in theatre, having worked as actor, musical director, composer and teacher through a long and distinguished career.  Originally from Edmonton, he now lives in Annan, not far from the Leith Church, but that is not his only connection with the story of Tom Thomson.  He still remembers when he was young how he was struck by seeing a painting called “The Fisherman”, one of the few Thomson paintings that has a human figure in it.  In 2002 he produced, with Joan Chandler, a musical based on Thomson’s life.  Although this current show includes a few songs written from that project, this is not a play.  “It’s more letting the songs tell the story,” he says, “we let the songs sing for themselves.  The way into his paintings is trying to imagine his thoughts.”  Some of them include excerpts from letters written or received by Thomson, and in addition to the original songs, the production will include some songs from Tom’s lifetime like Stephen Foster tunes and even some local songs.

Listen to, download and buy David Sereda’s music on iTunes by clicking on this album cover

To help him perform these songs, David has assembled a stellar group of musicians from the area, names familiar to local music fans.